By Tracie Sullivan, Iron County Today

 

A 5th District Court Judge sentenced a local man Tuesday to a maximum of 15 years in the Utah State Prison after prosecutors argued that his prior criminal record warranted a severe punishment.

Judge Jeffrey C. Wilcox sentenced Timothy Robert Williams, 46, to one to 15 years in the Utah State Prison following a plea deal in which the defendant admitted to charges of drug distribution and violation of a protective order. 

Williams, who was arrested on March 24, 2024, at the I-15 Northbound Kanarraville rest stop, was originally facing five charges. 

These included distributing a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, violation of a protective order, operating a vehicle without a license or registration, and operating a vehicle without insurance. 

According to court records, the arresting officer reported that during the traffic stop, Williams was found to be in violation of a protective order. Upon searching his vehicle, officers discovered approximately two pounds of methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia. Williams initially claimed the substance was for personal use but was charged with intent to distribute due to the large quantity.

During the sentencing, Iron County Prosecutor Shane Klenk highlighted Williams’ extensive criminal history pointing to the presentence investigation that scored the defendant on the highest level of the matrix. 

“The recommendation by APP is imprisonment and the state concurs,” Klenk said. “The defendant’s matrix score puts him on the highest level of the sentencing matrix, making him presumptive for prison. That is exceptionally difficult to achieve, but he has one of the most lengthy criminal histories I have ever seen.”

Klenk detailed Williams’ previous convictions, which include 12 felonies ranging from domestic violence assault to drug distribution and felony firearm crimes. 

“Law enforcement only found the defendant’s two pounds of meth because he was arrested for violating a protective order,” Klenk said. “The defendant claims he was purchasing in bulk for himself to last the year. This simply is not credible… It’s roughly $30,000 worth of product and is inconsistent with personal use. He especially does not get the benefit of the doubt given his distribution convictions both in 2022 and 2018. Prison is warranted, the defendant has earned it, and it’s appropriate.” 

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Cedar City Man Given Maximum Sentence for Distribution of Methamphetamine2 min read

By Tracie Sullivan, Iron County Today

 

A 5th District Court Judge sentenced a local man Tuesday to a maximum of 15 years in the Utah State Prison after prosecutors argued that his prior criminal record warranted a severe punishment.

Judge Jeffrey C. Wilcox sentenced Timothy Robert Williams, 46, to one to 15 years in the Utah State Prison following a plea deal in which the defendant admitted to charges of drug distribution and violation of a protective order. 

Williams, who was arrested on March 24, 2024, at the I-15 Northbound Kanarraville rest stop, was originally facing five charges. 

These included distributing a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, violation of a protective order, operating a vehicle without a license or registration, and operating a vehicle without insurance. 

According to court records, the arresting officer reported that during the traffic stop, Williams was found to be in violation of a protective order. Upon searching his vehicle, officers discovered approximately two pounds of methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia. Williams initially claimed the substance was for personal use but was charged with intent to distribute due to the large quantity.

During the sentencing, Iron County Prosecutor Shane Klenk highlighted Williams’ extensive criminal history pointing to the presentence investigation that scored the defendant on the highest level of the matrix. 

“The recommendation by APP is imprisonment and the state concurs,” Klenk said. “The defendant’s matrix score puts him on the highest level of the sentencing matrix, making him presumptive for prison. That is exceptionally difficult to achieve, but he has one of the most lengthy criminal histories I have ever seen.”

Klenk detailed Williams’ previous convictions, which include 12 felonies ranging from domestic violence assault to drug distribution and felony firearm crimes. 

“Law enforcement only found the defendant’s two pounds of meth because he was arrested for violating a protective order,” Klenk said. “The defendant claims he was purchasing in bulk for himself to last the year. This simply is not credible… It’s roughly $30,000 worth of product and is inconsistent with personal use. He especially does not get the benefit of the doubt given his distribution convictions both in 2022 and 2018. Prison is warranted, the defendant has earned it, and it’s appropriate.” 

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