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Cancer patient helps release eagle
by Ashley Langston
Nov 11, 2009 | 219 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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Martin Tyner of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation released a rehabilitated Golden Eagle with cancer patient Tammy Anderson Oct. 29. The bird flew a short distance and landed to get his bearings.
Tammy Anderson, who is currently undergoing cancer treatment, helped Martin Tyner of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation release a Golden Eagle at Parowan Gap Oct. 29 in honor of breast cancer awareness month.

Anderson, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 28 and has since had other types of cancer, is currently undergoing treatment for the disease that has spread throughout her body, her sister-in-law Sharon Daws said. She was very excited to be chosen to help release the bird and invited all her family members.

Anderson said it was a wonderful experience and she was honored to do it. She would do it again and again if she could. It was especially a good meaning for the release, she said.

Susan Tyner, of the foundation, said they asked the staff at the Sandra L. Maxwell Huntsman-Intermountain Cancer Center to choose someone to release the rehabilitated bird.

Martin Tyner said he got the 3-year-old Golden Eagle about a month before the release.

“The bird was really banged up and very thin,” he said in a press release. “Luckily there were no broken bones.”

The bird was picked up by the Fish and Game Department after severe winds blew through the Cedar City area.

With October being National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the eagle was released “in honor of cancer survivors, those lost, and those still fighting,” the press release reported.

“Many native cultures believe that when you say your prayers with an eagle feather it carries your prayer directly to God,” Martin Tyner said in the release. “This bird has over 7,000 feathers – that is a lot of prayers.”

The release was planned from the “C” overlook, but because of snow it was moved to Parowan Gap.

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