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Enoch discusses wastewater survey
by Ashley Langston
Jan 11, 2012 | 389 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
J. Kirk Lovell, Destry Griffiths, John Banks, and Michael Olenslager were sworn in as city councilors last Wednesday evening.
J. Kirk Lovell, Destry Griffiths, John Banks, and Michael Olenslager were sworn in as city councilors last Wednesday evening.
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ENOCH – The city council met last Wednesday, with three new members, and talked with Pete Sury of the Cedar City Wastewater Treatment Plant about a survey that is required to be sent out to businesses.

Destry Griffiths, Michael Olenslager and J. Kirk Lovell were sworn in at the beginning of the meeting to start their four-year terms. John Banks, who was elected to a two-year term after serving in 2011 as an appointed councilor, arrived later in the meeting and was sworn in as well. Councilor Rick Bonzo, who is on active duty with the Utah National Guard, participated in the meeting over the phone.

City Manager Rob Dotson said the wastewater survey is necessary because some metals have been detected in the wastewater coming from Enoch. Sury, pretreatment supervisor with the plant, said the industrial waster survey is state mandated, and the purpose is to identify industrial use of the system and see what pollutants are going in.

The survey is sent to Cedar City businesses twice yearly and as Enoch has an interlocal agreement that makes it possible for the city to use the plant, it should be sending the survey to its businesses as well, he said.

Sury said he thought the best thing to do would be to send out a mass mailing of the survey to all businesses, and in the future that may be able to be narrowed down and only sent to certain types of businesses. He and the council discussed having the survey be part of the business license application in the future.

The businesses who do not return the survey, he will follow up with, he added.

Dotson said he was bringing it before the council to inform them that the survey would be going out and to see how they felt about sending it with a letter on Enoch City letterhead, asking businesses to participate.

None of the city councilors expressed a problem with sending a letter from the city with the surveys.

The council also discussed the issue that in the personnel manual, it says the city will have an affirmative action plan. City Attorney Gary Kuhlmann said affirmative action and equal employment opportunity are two different things. Equal employment opportunity means they won’t discriminate and affirmative action came about basically to remedy past discrimination, and was not meant to be a permanent thing.

He said since the city doesn’t have, in his opinion, any past history of discrimination and its hiring has been reflective of its demographics, he doesn’t believe an affirmative action plan is appropriate for Enoch, and feels the language in the personnel manual should be changed to focus on equal employment opportunity.

Councilor Destry Griffiths voiced his support of this, saying he had major concerns with the concept of affirmative action.

“I think it promotes favoritism, and I don’t think favoritism is good,” he said.

He said he supports hiring based on merit.

The mayor gave the city councilors assignments at the meeting as well. Lovell will be involved with the building department, economic development, grants and the library. Bonzo will be involved with roads and trails, planning and zoning, and emergency response and CERT. Olenslager was assigned to be the Iron County School District coordinator and be involved with water and the water board, and prairie dogs.

Refuse (garbage and sewer), public safety, and holiday events (Halloween, Easter, and the Iron County Fair), were Griffiths’ assignments, and Banks’ were the July 4th celebration and Founders Day, parks and recreation, and the tree committee/beautification.

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